Carnegie Mellon University

ML Intro Classes for
Pittsburgh Campus

To choose between the Introduction to Machine Learning courses (10-301/10-601,10-315, 10-701, and 10-715), please read the Intro to ML Course Comparison.

You may also wish to take our self-assessment exam to evaluate your readiness for various Machine Learning courses.

For information about pre-requisites and timing, please see the Schedule of Classes or Student Information Online.

10-301/10-601 Introduction to Machine Learning (Undergrad/Master's Level)

Machine Learning (ML) develops computer programs that automatically improve their performance through experience. This includes learning many types of tasks based on many types of experience, e.g. spotting high-risk medical patients, recognizing speech, classifying text documents, detecting credit card fraud, or driving autonomous vehicles. 10301/10601 covers all or most of: concept learning, decision trees, neural networks, linear learning, active learning, estimation the bias-variance tradeoff, hypothesis testing, Bayesian learning, the MDL principle, the Gibbs classifier, Naive Bayes, Bayes Nets Graphical Models, the EM algorithm, Hidden Markov Models, K-Nearest-Neighbors and nonparametric learning, reinforcement learning, bagging, boosting and discriminative training. Intro to ML Course Comparison.

10-315 Introduction to Machine Learning
(SCS Undergraduate Majors)

Machine learning is subfield of computer science with the goal of exploring, studying, and developing learning systems, methods, and algorithms that can improve their performance with learning from data. This course is designed to give undergraduate students a one-semester-long introduction to the main principles, algorithms, and applications of machine learning and is specifically designed for the SCS undergrad majors. The topics of this course will be in part parallel with those covered in the graduate machine learning courses (10-715, 10-701, 10-601), but with a greater emphasis on applications and case studies in machine learning. After completing the course, students will be able to: *select and apply an appropriate supervised learning algorithm for classification problems (e.g., naive Bayes, perceptron, support vector machine, logistic regression). *select and apply an appropriate supervised learning algorithm for regression problems (e.g., linear regression, ridge regression). *recognize different types of unsupervised learning problems, and select and apply appropriate algorithms (e.g., clustering, linear and nonlinear dimensionality reduction). *work with probabilities (Bayes rule, conditioning, expectations, independence), linear algebra (vector and matrix operations, eigenvectors, SVD), and calculus (gradients, Jacobians) to derive machine learning methods such as linear regression, naive Bayes, and principal components analysis. *understand machine learning principles such as model selection, overfitting, and underfitting, and techniques such as cross-validation and regularization. *implement machine learning algorithms such as logistic regression via stochastic gradient descent, linear regression (using a linear algebra toolbox), perceptron, or k-means clustering. *run appropriate supervised and unsupervised learning algorithms on real and synthetic data sets and interpret the results.

10-701 Introduction to Machine Learning
(PhD Level)

Machine learning studies the question How can we build computer programs that automatically improve their performance through experience? This includes learning to perform many types of tasks based on many types of experience. For example, it includes robots learning to better navigate based on experience gained by roaming their environments, medical decision aids that learn to predict which therapies work best for which diseases based on data mining of historical health records, and speech recognition systems that learn to better understand your speech based on experience listening to you. This course is designed to give PhD students a thorough grounding in the methods, mathematics and algorithms needed to do research and applications in machine learning. Students entering the class with a pre-existing working knowledge of probability, statistics and algorithms will be at an advantage, but the class has been designed so that anyone with a strong numerate background can catch up and fully participate. Intro to ML Course Comparison.

10-715 Advanced Introduction to Machine Learning
(Advanced PhD Level)

The rapid improvement of sensory techniques and processor speed, and the availability of inexpensive massive digital storage, have led to a growing demand for systems that can automatically comprehend and mine massive and complex data from diverse sources. Machine Learning is becoming the primary mechanism by which information is extracted from Big Data, and a primary pillar that Artificial Intelligence is built upon. This course is designed for Ph.D. students whose primary field of study is machine learning, or who intend to make machine learning methodological research a main focus of their thesis. It will give students a thorough grounding in the algorithms, mathematics, theories, and insights needed to do in-depth research and applications in machine learning. The topics of this course will in part parallel those covered in the general graduate machine learning course (10-701), but with a greater emphasis on depth in theory and algorithms. The course will also include additional advanced topics such as privacy in machine learning, interactive learning, reinforcement learning, online learning, Bayesian nonparametrics, and additional material on graphical models. Students entering the class are expected to have a pre-existing strong working knowledge of algorithms, linear algebra, probability, and statistics. Intro to ML Course Comparison.